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A mathematician reads the newspaper

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Published by BasicBooks in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Mathematics -- Popular works

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [205]-206) ) and index.

StatementJohn Allen Paulos.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQA93 .P385 1995
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 212 p. :
Number of Pages212
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1121441M
ISBN 100465043623
LC Control Number94048206

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Mathematician Reads The Newspaper Unknown Binding – January 1, out of 5 stars 60 ratings. See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Kindle "Please retry" $ — 4/5(60). A Mathematician Reads the Newspaper Gina Kolata N OTICES OF THE AMS V OL NUMBER 3 mathematics that Paulos pre-sents and will learn little about newspa-pers and re-porting from his book. I had very mixed reactions to A Mathe-matician Reads the Newspaper. Although it is a short book with a sprightly air that makes it.   Strangely enough (or so one might think) I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I even caught myself chuckling aloud a few times. A Mathematician Reads the Newspaper de-mystifies the role Math plays in our everyday lives, and sheds a little (much needed) clarity on many of the "truths" behind the statistics we hear about all the by: Buy A Mathematician Reads the Newspaper: Making Sense of the Numbers in the Headlines (Penguin Science) by Paulos, John Allen (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(43).

As a lifelong fan of newspapers, Paulos provides a wide-ranging collection of musings on mathematics, the media and life itself." — Jon Van, Chicago Tribune "To the rescue comes our hero John Allen Paulos, that mysterious masked mathematician on a white horse, with his new book. John Allen Paulos is author of another book that you may have read or heard about, "Innumeracy", in which he describes the decline in the ability of Americans to perform simple mathematics, even arithmetic. In "A Mathematician Reads the Newspaper", he provides some of the reasons why mathematics is important to everyday life/5(8).   I found Professor Paulos's book, Innumeracy, to be a delightful expression of the key elements of mathematical ignorance that can be harmful, along with many new ways to see and think about the world around. You can imagine how much more pleased I was to find that A Mathematician Reads the Newspaper is an improvement over that valuable book/5(49). Get this from a library! A mathematician reads the newspaper. [John Allen Paulos] -- Mathematician John Allen Paulos employs his singular wit to guide us through an unlikely mathematical jungle--the pages of the daily newspaper. From the Senate and sex to celebrities and cults.

The essays in A Mathematician Reads the Newspaper are collected to illustrate the theme that mathematics can be and is misused in newspapers and other media to misrepresent or represent with a .   The quirky analytical mind of a mathematician asks, which of these scenarios is the correct backstory behind this headline? Paulos begins Section 5 (Food, Book Reviews, Sports, and Obituaries) by telling us that he seldom reads the food section. He finds the reviews of restaurants either pretentious or overly cute, and has little interest in. A Mathematician Reads the Newspaper John Allen Paulos With the same user-friendly, quirky, and perceptive approach that made Innumeracy a bestseller, John Allen Paulos travels though the pages of the daily newspaper showing how math and numbers are a . With the same user-friendly, quirky, and perceptive approach that made "Innumeracy" a bestseller, John Allen Paulos travels though the pages ofthe daily newspaper showing how math and numbers are a key element in many ofthe articles we read every day. From the Senate, SATs, and sex, to crime, celebrities, and cults, he takes stories that may not seem to involvemathematics at all and /5(13).